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dc.contributor.advisorHawkins, Peggyen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeggio, William J. Jren_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-11T14:41:32Z
dc.date.available2013-12-17T14:26:31Z
dc.date.issued2013-10-11en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/46833
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to learn how leadership is learned within an international context in Emergency Medical Services (EMS) by interviewing EMS professionals working in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Those interviewed either worked in EMS or had EMS training in countries other than Saudi Arabia. Each interview sought to understand the interviewee’s experience of learning and experiencing leadership as well as their recommendations on leadership. This study began in June of 2013 and included 19 participants.|EMS systems have similar roles and responsibilities in many countries around the world. At the most basic level, EMS systems are tasked with providing transport to a hospital. There is a requirement for stronger integration within traditional healthcare systems and evolving more complex systems to ensure public and emergency response. EMS systems continue to develop and evolve in countries worldwide. Therefore, the topic of leadership requirements for international EMS systems needed to be better understood. This clarity required further research.|This qualitative study took a phenomenological approach to examine shared international experiences of learning and experiencing leadership within the EMS profession. The data was collected during recorded conversations. The transcripts of the conversations were developed into coded themes (a) how leadership was learned; (b) who are leaders in EMS; (c) what are leadership qualities, characteristics, and capabilities; and (d) what are future needs for leadership development.|Three major implications emerged from the narrative transcripts, the recommendations by the participants, and connections made between the data and literature reviewed in this study. First, EMS education and training institutes need to develop a progression of leadership courses that integrate simulations, internships, and moves beyond leadership in the field to explore fully organizational and strategic leadership. Second major implication was for EMS licensing or certifying bodies to engage in requiring continuing education, not only on the technical skills within the profession, but on leadership development. Last major implication was for EMS systems to yield better leaders through objective processes, such as formal mentoring programs. In general, the EMS profession needs to engage in dialogue to address leadership development needs.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCreighton Universityen_US
dc.rightsCopyright is retained by the Author. A non-exclusive distribution right is granted to Creighton University and to ProQuest following the publishing model selected above.en_US
dc.titleHow Leadership is Learned in Emergency Medical Services: A Qualitative Study Among Emergency Medical Services Providers From Multiple Nations Working in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabiaen_US
dc.typeDissertation
dc.rights.holderWilliam J. Leggio, Jr.en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.description.noteProQuest Traditional Publishing Optionen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorLeggio, William J. Jren_US
dc.embargo.terms2013-12-17
dc.degree.levelEdD (Doctor of Education)en_US
dc.degree.disciplineInterdisciplinary Ed.D. Program in Leadershipen_US
dc.degree.nameEd.D. Program in Leadershipen_US
dc.degree.grantorGraduate Schoolen_US
dc.degree.committeeHawkins, Peggyen_US
dc.degree.committeeRaynovich, Williamen_US
dc.degree.committeeMartin, James R. Jr.en_US


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