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dc.contributor.authorDimond, Annie
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-05T03:36:33Z
dc.date.available2014-03-05T03:36:33Z
dc.date.issued2014-02-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/49083
dc.description.abstractThe Institute for Embodied Learning uses the merits of the Enneagram system to encourage students to know themselves a bit more complexly. It facilitates investigation into how who they are, in all their depth, mystery and subjectivity, is present in the world of the classroom. In recognizing how who they are is present and manifest in the classroom, new relationships can be forged between each student and the information, both student and content can be made into “subjects,” and thus relationships between subjects are enabled. The alternative is objectivism, which begets distancing and the relegation of everything to information that may or may not be integrated in to the lives of the learners.en_US
dc.publisherCreighton Universityen_US
dc.subject.lcshReflective learningen_US
dc.subject.lcshTransformative learningen_US
dc.subject.lcshSubjectivityen_US
dc.titleThe Institute for Embodied Learningen_US
dc.typeGenericen_US
dc.rights.holderAnnie Dimonden_US
dc.program.unitDeglman Hallen_US
dc.program.unitThe Institute for Embodied Learningen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorDimond, Annie


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