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dc.contributor.authorCrawford, Sueen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-09T18:08:34Z
dc.date.available2014-06-09T18:08:34Z
dc.date.issued2007-06-07en_US
dc.identifier.otherLectionary Number: 356en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/50542
dc.description.abstractBlessed are you O God of our fathers, praised be your name forever and ever.||My first reaction after seeing the verses for today was to marvel at the strangeness of the Tobit story. Actually, I didn't even get to the other verses before pulling out a bible to see how the story ends (yes, they live through the night). As I read the Tobit passage again after reading the other readings, I was struck by the wisdom in Tobiah's prayer. His prayer models important lessons from the other two readings, namely the importance of love of God and one another and the importance of reverent reliance on God alone.|Tobiah's prayer fits lessons on prayer throughout the scriptures. It emphasizes praise and thanksgiving first and foremost. It communicates the person's understanding of how God's promises, instructions or past faithfulness apply to the situation-drawing attention to the person's best understanding of God's agenda for the decision or event. In this case, the prayer also clarifies a Godly intent for an interpersonal human relationship. The actual petition for safety is only a small part of the prayer and it comes at the end-after taking time to praise God, to talk through possible applications of instructions or wisdom already gained, and to lay out his personal commitment. The priorities of the prayer are a right relationship with God and one another with the petition for safety then clearly following from these priorities. Consider how this model fits with Jesus' instructions to the disciples on how to pray and with scriptural accounts of Jesus' own prayers.|The prayer also models two important loving behaviors, praise for another and caring about another's priorities. Many of us would no doubt benefit from an effort to instill more of this into our communication with God and our communication with one another. Can we focus today on praising God and affirming one another? Can we take some time to consider what we already know about important priorities revealed by God and how those priorities could shape our decisions and actions today? Can we pay attention to the priorities of a family member or co-worker in some way today? Can we be attentive to ways that we fear people or things that keep us from loving God with our whole selves and loving our neighbors as ourselves? While I doubt that any of us will face a bridegroom devouring demon like Tobiah, practice in praiseful prayer and loving communication may help us to face our own challenges in ways that deepen our love and glorify God.|Blessed are you O God of our fathers, praised be your name forever and ever.|We thank you that you love us so much and that you care so deeply that we love you and love one another that you teach us that simple lesson over and over again. We praise you Jesus for teaching us this lesson tirelessly and so dramatically on the cross. We praise you Advocate for your presence with us and your faithfulness to prompt us to loving acts. We thank you Lord for your promises to bless those who fear you alone. Open our eyes to other fears that get in the way of loving you and loving others. Help us to marvel at blessings that come our way today and give you praise. Help us to honor and love those you put in our way today so to bring greater glory to you and to show them your love.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity Ministry, Creighton University.en_US
dc.relation.urihttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/65159
dc.rightsThese reflections may not be sold or used commercially without permission. Personal or parish use is permitted.en_US
dc.titleReflection for Thursday, June 7, 2007: 9th week in Ordinary Time.en_US
dc.typeEssay
dc.rights.holderUniversity Ministry, Creighton University.en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraska, United Statesen_US
dc.date.day7en_US
dc.date.year2007en_US
dc.date.monthJuneen_US
dc.program.unitCollege of Arts and Sciencesen_US
dc.program.unitPolitical Science and International Studiesen_US
dc.url.link1http://onlineministries.creighton.edu/CollaborativeMinistry/daily.htmlen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorCrawford, Susan E.en_US
dc.date.daynameThursdayen_US
dc.date.seasonOrdinary Timeen_US
dc.date.weekWeek: 9en_US
dc.relation.nexthttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/50557
dc.relation.previoushttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/50526
dc.subject.local1Tobit 6:10-11; 7:1bcde, 9-17; 8:4-9aen_US
dc.subject.local2Psalms 128:1-2, 3, 4-5en_US
dc.subject.local4Mark 12:28b-34en_US
dc.title.seriesDaily Reflections (Meditations) on the Scriptures from the Roman Catholic Lectionary.en_US
dc.date.cycleYear Ien_US


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    Reflections written by Creighton University faculty, staff, and administrators on the daily mass readings.

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