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dc.contributor.authorSchloemer, Tom, S.J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-09T18:28:20Z
dc.date.available2014-06-09T18:28:20Z
dc.date.issued1999-03-16en_US
dc.identifier.otherLectionary number: 245en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/52060
dc.description.abstractIn the first reading, Ezekiel's vision of the life-giving waters of the River of God and the healing waters of the Sheep Pool in the Gospel reading may initially lull us into a mood of contentment. The behavior of some of the Jews after Jesus' healing of the sick man jars that mood.||Fault was found with the man's carrying of his mat, a violation of the sabbath. In light of the circumstances, we might say: How unfeeling and legalistic! These same persons began to persecute Jesus because God, and only God, remains active on the sabbath, keeping all things in existence. Jesus' activity and directives on the sabbath thus lay claim to equality with the Father. We might say: What persistent unbelief!|Well, "some of the Jews," move over and make room for us within your ranks! We might ask ourselves: Do I find it easier simply to quote a law rather than to interpret the law according to the circumstances of the situation? Do I fail to give credit or virtually deny God's influence in the actions of those I find difficult? At times, we all have a pharisaical streak within us.|To whom do we look for guidance? Jesus, of course. The miracles, the mighty works, that accompanied these sabbath "violations," were not performed merely to impress, to substantiate Christ's divinity, but to respond to human needs. Only by such response on our parts, can we judge what is best in life's situations and can we suspend judgment of others in light of the mystery of God's grace. Only by such response to the needs of others can we immerse ourselves in the healing and life-giving waters of God's love.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity Ministry, Creighton University.en_US
dc.rightsThese reflections may not be sold or used commercially without permission. Personal or parish use is permitted.en_US
dc.titleReflection for Tuesday, March 16, 1999: 4th week in Lent.en_US
dc.typeEssay
dc.rights.holderUniversity Ministry, Creighton University.en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraska, United Statesen_US
dc.date.day16en_US
dc.date.year1999en_US
dc.date.monthMarchen_US
dc.program.unitVP for Student Servicesen_US
dc.program.unitCareer and Academic Planningen_US
dc.url.link1http://onlineministries.creighton.edu/CollaborativeMinistry/daily.htmlen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorSchloemer, Thomas N., S.J.en_US
dc.date.daynameTuesdayen_US
dc.date.seasonLenten_US
dc.date.weekWeek: 4en_US
dc.relation.nexthttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/52075
dc.relation.previoushttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/52046
dc.subject.local1Ezekiel 47:1-9, 12en_US
dc.subject.local2Psalms 46:2-3, 5-6, 8-9en_US
dc.subject.local4John 5:1-3a, 5-16en_US
dc.title.seriesDaily Reflections (Meditations) on the Scriptures from the Roman Catholic Lectionary.en_US
dc.date.cycleYear Ien_US


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  • Daily Reflections Archive
    Reflections written by Creighton University faculty, staff, and administrators on the daily mass readings.

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