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dc.contributor.authorBorchers, Paten_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-09T18:29:58Z
dc.date.available2014-06-09T18:29:58Z
dc.date.issued2011-04-09en_US
dc.identifier.otherLectionary number: 249en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/52319
dc.description.abstractSome years I felt like I "failed" Lent. I used to treat it like a required course that I didn't really want to take but needed to graduate. Rather than really participating in it, I would - in a metaphorical sense - sit in the back of the class, not say much, turn in as much homework as I needed to get by and wait for it to end. This, I can assure you, is not the way to approach Lent. Those years I would have been better off just ignoring it than going through the motions. Like the Pharisees in today's Gospel, I was trying to adhere to the letter of the law without so much as giving a thought to its spirit.||I have tried to sort through my memories as to why I used to think of Lent this way. I suppose part of it was that as a child I associated it only with "giving up" things and the anticipation of the fun of hunting for Easter eggs when that joyous day rolled around.|What finally snapped me out of it was a conversation with a Jesuit friend of mine here at Creighton who pointed out to me that Lent is actually a word for "Spring." As I pondered that fact, it finally occurred to me that I had been doing Lent all wrong. Of course abstaining from something is a good thing, but only if it really helps our spirits "spring" into Easter. The long slow rise of my spirit from Ash Wednesday to Easter is part of my re-growth process each year. Like the new green shoots appearing on plants in early spring, Lent is a sort of process of pruning and re-growth. What I really need to give up are the things that push me away from God. So even if we get a late start on Lent, there's still a chance to turn in our late "homework" (as I used to think of it) and begin again. It's never too early, and it's never too late.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity Ministry, Creighton University.en_US
dc.relation.urihttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/64937
dc.rightsThese reflections may not be sold or used commercially without permission. Personal or parish use is permitted.en_US
dc.titleReflection for Saturday, April 9, 2011: 4th week in Lent.en_US
dc.typeEssay
dc.rights.holderUniversity Ministry, Creighton University.en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraska, United Statesen_US
dc.date.day9en_US
dc.date.year2011en_US
dc.date.monthAprilen_US
dc.program.unitVP for Academic Affairsen_US
dc.program.unitSchool of Lawen_US
dc.program.unitWerner Instituteen_US
dc.url.link1http://onlineministries.creighton.edu/CollaborativeMinistry/daily.htmlen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorBorchers, Patrick J.en_US
dc.date.daynameSaturdayen_US
dc.date.seasonLenten_US
dc.date.weekWeek: 4en_US
dc.relation.nexthttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/52332
dc.relation.previoushttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/52304
dc.subject.local1Jeremiah 11:18-20en_US
dc.subject.local2Psalms 7:2-3, 9bc-10, 11-12en_US
dc.subject.local4John 7:40-53en_US
dc.title.seriesDaily Reflections (Meditations) on the Scriptures from the Roman Catholic Lectionary.en_US
dc.date.cycleYear Ien_US


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  • Daily Reflections Archive
    Reflections written by Creighton University faculty, staff, and administrators on the daily mass readings.

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