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dc.contributor.authorSchuler, Jeanneen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-09T19:38:34Z
dc.date.available2014-06-09T19:38:34Z
dc.date.issued2007-08-24en_US
dc.identifier.otherLectionary number: 629en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/53127
dc.description.abstractThe Greatness All Around||Their names, carved in stone, are found in parks and quiet gardens. Governors, presidents, queens, war dead. Those honored for service and studied in school. Some are heroes whom we call great.|The followers of Jesus were ordinary people. Scripture mentions some only once or twice. Little is known about their lives. But they are remembered as the first who said yes.|The story of Nathanael is attributed to Bartholomew the apostle. His friend Philip was excited. The one hailed by prophets was in their midst. Nathanael listened but had his doubts. What good could come from a paltry place like Nazareth? Still, he left his peaceful spot under the fig tree to follow his friend. When Jesus knew who he was, Nathanael was thrilled. Jesus promised more greatness to come.|Despite our achievements, it is tough to acknowledge greatness. We are experts at detecting flaws. There's always another story, an ulterior motive, a smear in the background. We read the world back into the self and then get bored by the self draped over everything. Greatness sounds na and iuml;ve, like someone fresh from the countryside struck by the gleaming city. We educated people see through things until they just fade away.|You call us to greatness. It begins in an ordinary way: trusting a friend, leaving our hiding place, being known, saying yes. The possibilities of being alive return. We venture out into a world suffused with your presence.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity Ministry, Creighton University.en_US
dc.relation.urihttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/65169
dc.rightsThese reflections may not be sold or used commercially without permission. Personal or parish use is permitted.en_US
dc.subject.otherSt. Bartholomewen_US
dc.titleReflection for Friday, August 24, 2007: St. Bartholomew.en_US
dc.typeEssay
dc.rights.holderUniversity Ministry, Creighton University.en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraska, United Statesen_US
dc.date.day24en_US
dc.date.year2007en_US
dc.date.monthAugusten_US
dc.program.unitCollege of Arts and Sciencesen_US
dc.program.unitPhilosophyen_US
dc.url.link1http://onlineministries.creighton.edu/CollaborativeMinistry/daily.htmlen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorSchuler, Jeanne A.en_US
dc.date.daynameFridayen_US
dc.date.seasonOrdinary Timeen_US
dc.date.weekWeek: 20en_US
dc.relation.nexthttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/53141
dc.relation.previoushttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/53113
dc.subject.local1Revelation 21:9b-14en_US
dc.subject.local2Psalms 145:10-13, 17-18en_US
dc.subject.local4John 1:45-51en_US
dc.title.seriesDaily Reflections (Meditations) on the Scriptures from the Roman Catholic Lectionary.en_US
dc.date.cycleYear Ien_US


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  • Daily Reflections Archive
    Reflections written by Creighton University faculty, staff, and administrators on the daily mass readings.

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