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dc.contributor.authorKestermeier, Chas, S.J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-09T19:40:41Z
dc.date.available2014-06-09T19:40:41Z
dc.date.issued2002-09-19en_US
dc.identifier.otherLectionary number: 446en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/53498
dc.description.abstractThere is such a thing as a bad question. "Have you stopped beating your wife, yes or no?" is one, and another is "Is Mary the Mother of God because she is the Immaculate Conception, or is she the Immaculate Conception because she is the Mother of God?" The lesson in today's gospel is based on a similar problem of language and reason.||Here Jesus tells the story of a man who is grateful because his debt is forgiven, then he turns around and applies the lesson backwards: the woman is forgiven because she has loved. The question of the size of the debt or the sin which is remitted is actually secondary here, at least to a great extent, as is the amount of gratitude or love involved. I believe that the implicit lesson is that love and forgiveness are indeed related to each other but not only in a clear causal manner: Jesus forgives us our sins when we ask and, almost completely separately, we love Jesus for who he is.|If this is not accurate, then we are making our relationship to Christ a matter of quid pro quo, a simple commercial exchange, and not what Jesus calls us to, deep friendship and actual inclusion into his divine family. We need to accept the fact that God loves us, simply and deeply, without any dependance on whether we love him or not: his love is always there, unchanging and powerful, no matter what we do, think, or desire, and forgiveness and healing are waiting for us when we ask for them. And, in an almost entirely independent movement, we should love, honor, and serve our God.|But that is a matter that will be clear to us in all of its simplicity only in heaven.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity Ministry, Creighton University.en_US
dc.rightsThese reflections may not be sold or used commercially without permission. Personal or parish use is permitted.en_US
dc.titleReflection for Thursday, September 19, 2002: 24th week in Ordinary Time.en_US
dc.typeEssay
dc.rights.holderUniversity Ministry, Creighton University.en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraska, United Statesen_US
dc.date.day19en_US
dc.date.year2002en_US
dc.date.monthSeptemberen_US
dc.program.unitKiewit Residence Hallen_US
dc.program.unitChaplainen_US
dc.program.unitCollege of Arts and Sciencesen_US
dc.program.unitEnglishen_US
dc.program.unitModern Languages and Literatureen_US
dc.url.link1http://onlineministries.creighton.edu/CollaborativeMinistry/daily.htmlen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorKestermeier, Charles T., S.J.en_US
dc.date.daynameThursdayen_US
dc.date.seasonOrdinary Timeen_US
dc.date.weekWeek: 24en_US
dc.relation.nexthttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/53513
dc.relation.previoushttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/53483
dc.subject.local11 Corinthians 15:1-11en_US
dc.subject.local2Psalms 118:1b-2, 16ab, 17, 28en_US
dc.subject.local4Luke 7:36-50en_US
dc.title.seriesDaily Reflections (Meditations) on the Scriptures from the Roman Catholic Lectionary.en_US
dc.date.cycleYear IIen_US


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  • Daily Reflections Archive
    Reflections written by Creighton University faculty, staff, and administrators on the daily mass readings.

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