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dc.contributor.authorSchuler, Jeanneen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-09T19:42:59Z
dc.date.available2014-06-09T19:42:59Z
dc.date.issued2010-12-17en_US
dc.identifier.otherLectionary number: 193en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/53893
dc.description.abstractThey Brought Us to this Place|Jesus is born of Mary but his lineage traces back through Joseph. Before Jesus' birth in Matthew's gospel comes the genealogy of names, familiar and strange. A guiding thread runs through the messy pages of history: God like a scavenger uncovers salvation in the debris and treasure of human lives. Unlike the litany of the saints, this roll call places scoundrels alongside the blessed. The child welcomed by shepherds and Magi represents the whole of Israel and all peoples.|Only four women are named on the ancestral tree of 52 branches: Tamar, Rahab, Ruth, Bathsheba. These women are marked by scandal, exclusion, and courage. The widow Tamar, disguised as a prostitute, is engaged by Judah, her father-in-law, and bears twin sons. Rahab is remembered as the harlot who hides the Israelite spies in her home before the battle of Jericho. Ruth, the Moabite woman, leaves her people to accompany her mother-in-law, Naomi, and bear the family an heir. Bathsheba is seduced by the king, who then kills her husband. Prostitute, traitor, foreigner, rape victim. The unusual aspects of Jesus' birth are heralded by the notoriety of these mothers. We come to recognize what is holy in new ways.|In our day most care more about genes than genealogy. Our memories go back one or two generations before fading like cheap photos. The absence of a past counts as freedom: as individuals, we are not shackled by old ways. We spring up fresh like wildflowers on unplowed prairie. When the situation gets grim, we move on or dream of starting over.|Advent pulls us back from the emptiness that haunts this world. The stories of our ancestors are retold. Their words bring hope like light in the darkness; absence gives way to comforting presence. Guardians are watching over us. No one is driven out. All are called into this tribe. All belongen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity Ministry, Creighton University.en_US
dc.relation.urihttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/64921
dc.rightsThese reflections may not be sold or used commercially without permission. Personal or parish use is permitted.en_US
dc.titleReflection for Friday, December 17, 2010: 3rd week in Advent.en_US
dc.typeEssay
dc.rights.holderUniversity Ministry, Creighton University.en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraska, United Statesen_US
dc.date.day17en_US
dc.date.year2010en_US
dc.date.monthDecemberen_US
dc.program.unitCollege of Arts and Sciencesen_US
dc.program.unitPhilosophyen_US
dc.url.link1http://onlineministries.creighton.edu/CollaborativeMinistry/daily.htmlen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorSchuler, Jeanne A.en_US
dc.date.daynameFridayen_US
dc.date.seasonAdventen_US
dc.date.weekWeek: 3en_US
dc.relation.nexthttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/55128
dc.relation.previoushttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/53879
dc.subject.local1Genesis 49:2, 8-10en_US
dc.subject.local2Psalms 72:1-2, 3-4ab, 7-8, 17en_US
dc.subject.local4Matthew 1:1-17en_US
dc.title.seriesDaily Reflections (Meditations) on the Scriptures from the Roman Catholic Lectionary.en_US
dc.date.cycleYear Ien_US


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  • Daily Reflections Archive
    Reflections written by Creighton University faculty, staff, and administrators on the daily mass readings.

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