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dc.contributor.authorWirth, Eileenen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-09T20:03:07Z
dc.date.available2014-06-09T20:03:07Z
dc.date.issued2013-12-30en_US
dc.identifier.otherLectionary number: 203en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/55376
dc.description.abstract"There was a prophetess, Anna ... " Luke|The prophetess Anna rates just one mention in Luke as she thanks God for the birth of Jesus and tells people at the Temple about his importance. I love this passage because I resonate to its 84-year-old heroine.|Picture the Temple that day as a stately, wrinkled, white-haired woman with kind eyes pronounces her great news. Even men who normally would pay little attention to a woman can't ignore Anna because of the palpable wisdom that her well-lived, long life has bestowed. Even her name is fitting: Anna, meaning "grace" or "favor."|It's especially easy for me to conjure up images of the Biblical Anna because I grew up with a wise old woman who shared her name, my Great Aunt Anna or "Aunt Annie" as everyone called her.|Aunt Annie prayed mostly in a little farmhouse, not the Temple, but she was devout in her own cock-eyed fashion, conversing regularly with God. She'd read the Bible and comment on Old Testament stories that reminded her of her beloved murder mysteries.|Like the Biblical Anna, Aunt Annie saw wonder and hope in children. Remembering how she would defend us to our male elders, it's easy to envision Anna speaking authoritatively about the child to skeptical men in the Temple. Magnificent women, both, I'm sure!|One thing we notice in the New Testament is that God sometimes uses obscure people such as Anna to announce great news, like the significance of this child. We sense that they represent us, especially when they remind us of people we know.|So today I thank St. Luke for shining light on the beauty and wisdom of such people, especially those who happen to be older women. I hope that today's Gospel also evokes joyful memories of the "Annas" and "Aunt Annies" in your own lives.|Happy New Year!!!!!en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity Ministry, Creighton University.en_US
dc.relation.urihttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/64815
dc.rightsThese reflections may not be sold or used commercially without permission. Personal or parish use is permitted.en_US
dc.titleReflection for Monday, December 30, 2013: Sixth day in the Octave of Christmas.en_US
dc.typeEssay
dc.rights.holderUniversity Ministry, Creighton University.en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraska, United Statesen_US
dc.date.day30en_US
dc.date.year2013en_US
dc.date.monthDecemberen_US
dc.program.unitCollege of Arts and Sciencesen_US
dc.program.unitJournalism, Media and Computingen_US
dc.url.link1http://onlineministries.creighton.edu/CollaborativeMinistry/daily.htmlen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorWirth, Eileen M.en_US
dc.date.daynameMondayen_US
dc.date.seasonChristmasen_US
dc.date.weekOctave of Christmasen_US
dc.relation.nexthttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/55377
dc.relation.previoushttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/54035
dc.subject.local11 John 2:12-17en_US
dc.subject.local2Psalms 96:7-8a, 8b-9, 10en_US
dc.subject.local4Luke 2:36-40en_US
dc.title.seriesDaily Reflections (Meditations) on the Scriptures from the Roman Catholic Lectionary.en_US
dc.date.cycleYear IIen_US


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  • Daily Reflections Archive
    Reflections written by Creighton University faculty, staff, and administrators on the daily mass readings.

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