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dc.contributor.authorRoedlach, Alexen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-09T20:03:12Z
dc.date.available2014-06-09T20:03:12Z
dc.date.issued2013-11-01en_US
dc.identifier.otherLectionary number: 667en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/55391
dc.description.abstractWhen times are tough, some individuals draw on the apocalyptic language of some of the Biblical books to give meaning to what they experience. Today's first reading is often used for such purposes because the text refers to global destruction and some of us, who experience difficulties, insecurities, and threats to their lives, conclude that this reading is now a reality: our world is coming to an end. But is this really implied by the Book of Revelation or do we misunderstand the apocalyptic language?||The apocalyptic language is a language of transformation and transformation can be painful. Our world needs to be transformed in order to match the God's Kingdom. References to destruction tell us that much of our world is contrary to God's command and Christ's Good News. Much of what we do needs to be transformed by the Sacred Scriptures. This is not easy, expects major changes from us as individuals and societies, makes us vulnerable, and exposes us to risks. However, as followers of Christ, we have been marked with the "seal of the living God," as the first reading says, we are among this "great multitude, which no one could count, from every nation, race, people, and tongue." We are among those, who "have washed their robes ... in the Blood of the Lamb." Thus, nothing can harm us in difficult times, in times of transformation, as we try to change our society through the Good News.|The first and second reading are quite general and do not specify what it means for Christ's followers, for the Church, to be part of this transformation process. However, the Sermon on the Mount in today's Gospel is very clear in identifying who will enter the Kingdom of God, who are those who transformed the world inspired by Christ's teaching.|As we read the Sermon on the Mount let us meditate over its relevance for us, the Church, who are called to change the world through Christ's teachings. Let us pray for our Christian communities, parishes, and the Church as a whole, to transform our society, our economic systems shaped by inequalities contrary to Christ's teaching, our political systems which often favor the elite and do not sufficiently protect those at the fringes of society who are God's priority. Let us pray for and recognize international relations which reflect global disparities in wealth and power, contradicting Christ's teaching on equality and equity.|As we endeavor to change the world, we do so knowing that God is on our side, that we are marked with the "seal of the living God," and that ultimately we will "rejoice and be glad, for [our] reward will be great in heaven." On this day, the Solemnity of All Saints, we remember those who transformed the world and who are now "rejoicing ... in heaven." Their example inspires us and they accompany us through their prayer and intervention.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity Ministry, Creighton University.en_US
dc.relation.urihttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/64860
dc.rightsThese reflections may not be sold or used commercially without permission. Personal or parish use is permitted.en_US
dc.subject.otherAll Saints, Solemnityen_US
dc.titleReflection for Friday, November 1, 2013: All Saints, Solemnity.en_US
dc.typeEssay
dc.rights.holderUniversity Ministry, Creighton University.en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraska, United Statesen_US
dc.date.day1en_US
dc.date.year2013en_US
dc.date.monthNovemberen_US
dc.program.unitCollege of Arts and Sciencesen_US
dc.program.unitAnthropology and Sociologyen_US
dc.program.unitSociology, Anthropology, and Social Worken_US
dc.url.link1http://onlineministries.creighton.edu/CollaborativeMinistry/daily.htmlen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorRodlach, Alexanderen_US
dc.date.daynameFridayen_US
dc.date.seasonOrdinary Timeen_US
dc.date.weekWeek: 30en_US
dc.relation.nexthttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/55405
dc.relation.previoushttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/54422
dc.subject.local1Revelation 7:2-4, 9-14en_US
dc.subject.local2Psalms 24:1bc-2, 3-4ab, 5-6en_US
dc.subject.local31 John 3:1-3en_US
dc.subject.local4Matthew 5:1-12aen_US
dc.title.seriesDaily Reflections (Meditations) on the Scriptures from the Roman Catholic Lectionary.en_US
dc.date.cycleYear Cen_US


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  • Daily Reflections Archive
    Reflections written by Creighton University faculty, staff, and administrators on the daily mass readings.

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