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dc.contributor.authorBorchers, Paten_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-09T20:03:39Z
dc.date.available2014-06-09T20:03:39Z
dc.date.issued2012-11-06en_US
dc.identifier.otherLectionary number: 486en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/55460
dc.description.abstractI want today to focus on the first reading, because it's one of my favorites and, I believe, one of the most important in the New Testament.|A great deal of ink has been spilled by theologians over Jesus' nature and person. Was he wholly divine? If so, how does that fit with him clearly having flesh and blood and feeling pain and suffering like the rest of us? I am not a trained theologian and won't attempt a theological answer to those questions.|Jesus clearly was human in the sense that if you were alive during his time you could have touched him, heard him speak with a human voice, and so on. So I think that explains those difficult lines "though he was in the form of God, did not regard equality with God something to be grasped." Read too quickly, it seems to state a contradiction. If Jesus was in the "form" of God, how could he not be "equal" to God?|The point, I think, is that we aren't supposed to try to be God. In fact, when humans try to play God, the results are catastrophic. Rather, we should try to do what Jesus did, which is to empty ourselves so that there's room for God's love and grace. If we fill ourselves with self import, there's no room left for God's love and grace.|Of course, we won't do it perfectly. I in particular struggle with letting issues of the material world overwhelm me so that I don't leave the room I should for God's love. In that sense, I suspect, all of us could use a little emptying.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity Ministry, Creighton University.en_US
dc.relation.urihttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/64915
dc.rightsThese reflections may not be sold or used commercially without permission. Personal or parish use is permitted.en_US
dc.titleReflection for Tuesday, November 6, 2012: 31st week in Ordinary Time.en_US
dc.typeEssay
dc.rights.holderUniversity Ministry, Creighton University.en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraska, United Statesen_US
dc.date.day6en_US
dc.date.year2012en_US
dc.date.monthNovemberen_US
dc.program.unitVP for Academic Affairsen_US
dc.program.unitSchool of Lawen_US
dc.program.unitWerner Instituteen_US
dc.url.link1http://onlineministries.creighton.edu/CollaborativeMinistry/daily.htmlen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorBorchers, Patrick J.en_US
dc.date.daynameTuesdayen_US
dc.date.seasonOrdinary Timeen_US
dc.date.weekWeek: 31en_US
dc.relation.nexthttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/55474
dc.relation.previoushttps://dspace.creighton.edu/xmlui/handle/10504/55446
dc.subject.local1Philippians 2:5-11en_US
dc.subject.local2Psalms 22:26b-27, 28-30ab, 30e, 31-32en_US
dc.subject.local4Luke 14:15-24en_US
dc.title.seriesDaily Reflections (Meditations) on the Scriptures from the Roman Catholic Lectionary.en_US
dc.date.cycleYear IIen_US


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  • Daily Reflections Archive
    Reflections written by Creighton University faculty, staff, and administrators on the daily mass readings.

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