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dc.contributor.authorDallon, Craig W.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-27T13:49:59Z
dc.date.available2014-06-27T13:49:59Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationCraig W. Dallon, The Anti-Bootlegging Provisions: Congressional Power and Constitutional Limitations, 13 Vand. J. Ent. & Tech. L. 255 (2011).en_US
dc.identifier.issn1942-678Xen_US
dc.identifier.issn1942-6771en_US
dc.identifier.issn1536-3872en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/61447
dc.description.abstractCourts and scholars have considered the constitutional validity of 17 U.S.C.§ 1101 (civil), and 18 U.S.C. § 2319A (criminal), known as "the anti-bootlegging provisions." These provisions prohibit unauthorized recording, copying and distribution of live musical performances. The provisions have been challenged in three cases, resulting in five different published opinions. Two district court opinions held the provisions unconstitutional, but subsequent opinions vacated those decisions. Notwithstanding a sharp division among copyright scholars, the courts have upheld these provisions. The discussion surrounding these provisions demonstrates a continuing struggle to ascertain limits on congressional power to regulate copying and distribution of expression. The latest decision in this area, United States v. Martignon, 492 F.3d 140 (2d Cir. 2007), found that Congress had the power to enact § 2319A, but left two major issues unresolved. First, it only considered the constitutionality of the criminal provision, and its analysis calls into doubt the constitutionality of the companion civil anti-bootlegging provision that was not before the court. Second, Martignon did not consider the first amendment free speech challenge to the statute and remanded the case for consideration of that issue.|This article demonstrates that the Constitution firmly supports Congress's power to enact the anti-bootlegging provisions as an exercise of the Commerce Clause, which does not conflict with the Copyright Clause, and does not violate the First Amendmenten_US
dc.titleAnti-bootlegging provisions: Congressional power and constitutional limitationsen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderCopyright (c) 2011 Craig W. Dallonen_US
dc.description.volume13en_US
dc.title.workVanderbilt Journal of Entertainment and Technology Lawen_US
dc.description.pages255-321en_US
dc.subject.fastConstitutional lawen_US
dc.subject.fastIntellectual propertyen_US
dc.url.fasthttp://id.worldcat.org/fast/00875797en_US
dc.url.fasthttp://id.worldcat.org/fast/00975774en_US
dc.date.year2011en_US
dc.date.monthWinteren_US
dc.description.issue2en_US
dc.program.unitSchool of Lawen_US
dc.url.link3http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2116679en_US
dc.url.link1https://www.heinonline.org/HOL/Page?public=false&handle=hein.journals/vanep13&men_hide=false&men_tab=citnav&collection=journals&id=259en_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorDallon, Craig W.en_US
dc.identifier.viafhttp://viaf.org/viaf/406148996231759752942en_US
dc.identifier.wcihttps://www.worldcat.org/identities/np-dallon,%20craig%20w/en_US
dc.identifier.ssrnhttp://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/cf_dev/AbsByAuth.cfm?per_id=622739en_US


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