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dc.contributor.advisorRubarth, Lori B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorOlson, Morganen_US
dc.contributor.authorBaas Rubarth, Lorien_US
dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, Katieen_US
dc.contributor.authorAbbott, Amyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-30T21:18:25Z
dc.date.available2015-05-17T08:40:19Z
dc.date.issued2014-07-30
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/62593
dc.description.abstractThe optimal goal when providing heated humidification to neonates receiving respiratory support is to mimic natural gas conditioning with core temperature at 37°C, 100% saturation with water vapor, and absolute humidity of 44mg/L. Mechanically producing heat and humidification similar to that of the natural airway is multifactorial and difficult to obtain. The amount of heat and moisture that should be delivered to neonates receiving respiratory support remains unknown and there lacks a clear standard of care in managing heated humidification settings. Condensation is one of many consequences associated with less than optimal humidification and has become a challenging adverse effect of inadequate humidification in the neonatal population. The primary purpose of this project was compile existing evidence, assist health professionals and researchers to achieve a better understanding about the topic, and develop a standard/guideline for heated humidification to improve the outcomes of premature and sick neonates within the Alegent-Creighton Health System. The purpose of this study was to identify which infant factors, environmental factors, and respiratory support factors affect condensation levels in neonates receiving respiratory support. This is an observational study and a descriptive analysis of the factors that contribute to respiratory condensation. A convenience sample of hospitalized neonates from a level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit were utilized. Chi-square test is being used for statistical analysis of categorical data. Correlations of continuous variables are also being explored. The data revealed condensation associated with invasive ventilation and higher respiratory heater temperatures of 37 degrees Celsius.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright is retained by the Author. A non-exclusive distribution right is granted to Creighton Universityen_US
dc.subject.meshHumidityen_US
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_US
dc.subject.meshInfant, Prematureen_US
dc.subject.meshIntensive Care Units, Neonatalen_US
dc.subject.meshVentilators, Mechanicalen_US
dc.subject.meshContinuous Positive Airway Pressureen_US
dc.titleFactors Affecting Heated Humidity and Condensation in Neonates Receiving Respiratory Supporten_US
dc.title.alternativeRespiratory Condensation in Neonatesen_US
dc.typeManuscripten_US
dc.rights.holderMorgan Olsonen_US
dc.description.noteManuscripten_US
dc.embargo.terms2015-05-17
dc.degree.levelDNPen_US
dc.degree.disciplineDoctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Programen_US
dc.degree.nameDoctor of Nursing Practiceen_US
dc.degree.committeeMcDonald, Katieen_US
dc.degree.committeeAbbott, Amyen_US


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