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dc.contributor.advisorHorning, Rossen_US
dc.contributor.authorHa, Clara Moonjaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-11T16:40:11Z
dc.date.available2014-08-11T16:40:11Z
dc.date.issued1968en_US
dc.identifier.otherRAL Thesis 1968 H3en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/62688
dc.description.abstractInternational politics is "power politics," and simple solutions are not possible. There are many elements in each situation, and many tendencies in each. Under these complicated situations, the best way that one can do, is to find through analysis, the most likely tendency or tendencies that will develop.|The Korean case was, no doubt, an example of international politics. Democracy and Communism collided in a small area, but with grave importance. The infant United Nations had to prove its capability to handle the matter. If it could not, its survival as an international organization would be fatally impaired. Its life being challenged, the United Nations acted firmly and promptly to preserve peace and to prevent a third world war.|Yet, along with the development of the situation, many elements became involved, making a simple solution impossible. Members of the United Nations, policy makers in Washington, and the policy carriers at the battle field had their own solutions in handling the Korean case, and when they did not completely agree with each other, and when no concession seemed forthcoming, a break was only a matter of time.|Having tried to grasp the true condition of the Truman-MacArthur controversy, but faced with a great difficulty in doing so because of its "unilateral" informations, the author avoided in bringing up many controversial matters which ultimately could not be explained for many years to come. Instead, I tried to give some general background of why the United States became involved in the Korean problem, and why MacArthur's proposal was welcomed by most Koreans. This approach was thought as one way to look at the conflict. The President's right to dismiss his subordinate is authorized by the United States Constitution, and his decision to exercise that right should not be criticized. Thus, in no sense, does this thesis attempt to analyse or to show any personal feeling of the dismissal. Rather, it tries to sum up the reasons why the Koreans were disappointed in the dismissal of General MacArthur. MacArthur's proposal was seen as the only possible way to unite the country, and his recall was looked upon as a severe blow for the unification of the country.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCreighton Universityen_US
dc.rightsCopyright 1968en_US
dc.subjectKorea--Historyen_US
dc.subjectUnited States--Historyen_US
dc.titleGeneral Douglas MacArthur in Koreaen_US
dc.typeThesis
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.description.noteRAL Thesis 1968 H3en_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorHa, Clara Moonjaen_US
dc.degree.levelMA (Master of Arts)en_US
dc.degree.disciplineHistory (graduate program)en_US
dc.degree.nameM.A. in Historyen_US
dc.degree.grantorGraduate Schoolen_US
dc.degree.committeeUmscheid, Arthur G.en_US


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