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dc.contributor.authorJenkins, Billen_US
dc.contributor.editorSimkins, Ronald A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-26T18:11:04Z
dc.date.available2014-11-26T18:11:04Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationJenkins, Bill. (2009), Barabbas in literature and film. Journal of Religion & Society, 11.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1522-5658en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/64437
dc.description.abstractBarabbas, unlike Pilate or Judas or even other biblical characters who, like him, are barely mentioned in various Gospel accounts and yet who have received much attention – such as Mary Magdalene or Salome – received little attention before the twentieth century. But since then his ambiguous status as bandit, murderer, or freedom fighter fits in well with the ambiguous positions of art and religion in the modern world. A person who was given just a few sentences in the Bible finally has become a subject of artistic interest, reflecting the contradictory aspects of modern culture in which rebellion can run the spectrum from noble self-sacrifice for the greater good to self-serving justification of the love of violence. Though some of the works exploring the meaning of Barabbas are obviously of inferior quality, the others offer trenchant explorations of an engrossing character, reflecting to us our struggles with religious faith in the contemporary, secularized world. Barabbas represents the condition most of us have experienced: through forces outside our control we are placed in a relationship with possible truth, a relationship we can either turn away from for other, proximate human truths, or we can turn toward, even if we cannot always decipher its meaning. Barabbas is a noble revolutionary, a vicious criminal, an accident of politics and mob psychology, perhaps even a love interest, and a shadowy figure whose brief contact with Jesus is left in the dark. In his own way, differing from that of Pilate or Judas, Barabbas can speak uniquely from the distant world of the Gospels to the modern world in ways we immediately recognize.en_US
dc.publisherRabbi Myer and Dorothy Kripke Center, Creighton Universityen_US
dc.rightsThe journal is open-access and freely allows users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of all published material for personal or academic purposes.en_US
dc.subject.otherBarabbas (Biblical character)en_US
dc.subject.otherLagerkvist, Pär, 1891-1974en_US
dc.subject.otherField, Sara Bard, 1882-1974en_US
dc.subject.otherBekessy, Emmerichen_US
dc.subject.otherBible in literatureen_US
dc.subject.otherBible in filmen_US
dc.subject.otherFilms, Religiousen_US
dc.titleBarabbas in literature and filmen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderRabbi Myer and Dorothy Kripke Center, Creighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume11en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workJournal of Religion & Societyen_US


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