Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorBergquist, Gordon N.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAndrews, Robert Earleen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-22T20:03:19Z
dc.date.available2015-06-22T20:03:19Z
dc.date.issued1964en_US
dc.identifier.otherRAL Thesis 1964 A53en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/69115
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION:|Historians of the future may well take their cue from W. H. Auden and refer to the first six decades of the Twentieth Century as the "Age of Anxiety". In these sixty years the world has seldom, if ever, known a time that could be considered as one completely devoid of fears and anxieties. For the most part the years have provided a succession of alarming crises and apprehensive situations. The world has faced and survived, among its other stringent tests, two great global conflicts, a shattering economic depression, and the discovery of an awesome power for possible self-destruction. Perhaps the true keynote of this century was struck by Franklin Delano Roosevelt in his inaugural address in 1933 with his pronouncement "that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself." These words did more than catch the emotional state of man in the depths of the Great Depression; they trumpeted forth the warning that anxiety, the fear of fear, had become a force to be reckoned with in the modern world. A generation of men had grown up in the climate of war and had attained maturity in the artificial atmosphere of the "Roaring Twenties." The man of this generation, taken either singularly or collectively, has weathered his traumatic experiences, driven always by that force which Kierkegaard called Angst. He was, as Jean Wahl observes in his presentation of the Kierkegaardian figure, "essentially anxious and infinitely interested in respect to his existence." In the opinion of Basil King, the man of the Twentieth Century "was born into fear in that he was born into a world of which most of the energies were set against him."But what is fear? And what is anxiety? Can the two be equated with each other and with fright? If one is to reach any degree of understanding regarding the potency of these instrumental forces, he must seek definitions of greater range than those supplied by the average dictionary.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCreighton Universityen_US
dc.titleThe fear motif in the poetry of Robert Frosten_US
dc.typeThesis
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.description.noteRAL Thesis 1964 A53en_US
dc.description.noteAndrews_R-1964-MA.pdfen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorAndrews, Robert Earleen_US
dc.degree.levelMA (Master of Arts)en_US
dc.degree.disciplineEnglish (graduate program)en_US
dc.degree.nameM.A. in Englishen_US
dc.degree.grantorGraduate Schoolen_US
dc.degree.committeeUmscheid, Arthur D.en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record