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dc.contributor.advisorRubarth, Lori B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorShipley, Amyen_US
dc.contributor.authorRubarth, Lorien_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-17T15:58:17Z
dc.date.available2016-05-16T08:40:07Z
dc.date.issued2015-07-17
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/69998
dc.description.abstractProblem: The prevention of premature births has been a goal for perinatologists and pernatal nursing for decades. Bed rest is a solution that has been utilized to help prevent preterm births but there are many complications from this treatment. Bed rest can occur in the hospital (antepartum unit) or at home. Bed rest within the hospital creates many issues for the pregnant women and her family, including increased stress from separation and increased fear about their pregnancy. While on bed rest, the mother is separated from the rest of her family in a sometimes hostile or fearful environment. Prenatal nurses are in the position to assist the mother and family during her period of hospitalization. Alleviating stress and providing support to the mother on bed rest is needed to improve fetal outcomes.|Methods: The design of this study is exploratory and descriptive. Surveys were issued to women who had experienced bed rest prior to their delivery of their preterm infants(s). The sample of 10 mothers was obtained from the level III NICU where the infants were being cared for after delivery.|Results: The survey utilized was the post-delivery Maternal Support survey. The 10 mothers who were issued the survey had very similar results. 100% of those surveyed were moderately to very stressed during bed rest. 20% of the mothers utilized Moms in waiting website. 50% received a tour of the NICU, with 100% of mothers having at least one visit from the Neonatologist during their time on bedrest. The survey also reported that of the mothers who did not receive a tour, 100% of them felt it would have calmed some of their stress about having their baby in the NICU. Those that did receive the tour found it very helpful. The survey also showed that infants were born preterm ranging from 28-34 weeks gestation.|Conclusion: The post-delivery survey was enlightening in a few areas. As expected all the women surveyed expressed feeling moderate to very stressed during their bed rest. Shocking was the fact that 50% of the mothers surveyed never got a tour of the NICU and those mothers expressed feeling more stress related to what to expect once their infant was in the NICU. This is an area of stress that as neonatal nurses, high risk OB nurses and even perinatologists can help to alleviate by providing the women and the father education about the NICU as well as a tour so they know what the incubators, ventilatiors, monitors look and even sound like. This is an area that we need to show improvement in so that the mothers and their families feel supported so that we can improve fetal outcomes.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright is retained by the Author. A non-exclusive distribution right is granted to Creighton Universityen_US
dc.subject.meshBed Resten_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Supporten_US
dc.subject.meshPrenatal Careen_US
dc.titleSupport for the Pregnant Mother on Bed Resten_US
dc.typeManuscripten_US
dc.rights.holderAmy Shipleyen_US
dc.description.noteManuscripten_US
dc.program.unitSchool of Nursing (1971 - July 2013)en_US
dc.program.unitCollege of Nursingen_US
dc.embargo.terms2016-05-16
dc.degree.levelMSNen_US
dc.degree.disciplineMaster of Science in Nursing (MSN) Degree Programen_US
dc.degree.nameMaster of Science in Nursingen_US


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