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dc.contributor.authorWood, Simon A.en_US
dc.contributor.editorSimkins, Ronald A.en_US
dc.contributor.editorKelly, Thomas M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-20T22:26:09Z
dc.date.available2016-01-20T22:26:09Z
dc.date.issued2016en_US
dc.identifier.issn1941-8450en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/74603
dc.description.abstractThis essay explores the benefits and limitations of attempting to capture certain Muslim identities with the terms “fundamentalism” and “Islamism,” commenting particularly on two recent anthologies on the topic. It finds that in both cases limitations outweigh benefits, arguing that discussions of Muslim identity are better served by leaving these terms out of the conversation. While the essay gives several reasons for this determination, two are prominent. First, the terms lack precision. Whereas this has long been a difficulty, the essay suggests that the scholarship examined has not resolved it, and the criticisms of the terms’ critics remain unanswered. Second, if one asks the question “why should we use these terms?” there does not appear to be any compelling affirmative answer. We have at our disposal other terms that carry less problematical baggage and better serve analysis.en_US
dc.publisherRabbi Myer and Dorothy Kripke Center, Creighton Universityen_US
dc.rightsThe journal is open-access and freely allows users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of all published material for personal or academic purposes.en_US
dc.titleCapturing Islam: Religion, Identity, and the Turn to Islamismen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.rights.holderRabbi Myer and Dorothy Kripke Center, Creighton Universityen_US
dc.description.volume13en_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.title.workSupplement Series for the Journal of Religion & Societyen_US
dc.description.noteReligion and Identityen_US


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