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dc.contributor.advisorRamsden, Graham P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSendelbach, Drew D.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-10T16:50:12Z
dc.date.available2011-08-24T07:45:19Z
dc.date.issued2010-08-13en_US
dc.identifier.otherThesis-D-Sendelbach.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/7598
dc.description.abstractThe goal of this paper is to determine why some Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries allocate more public expenditure to research and development of renewable energy than others. This is attempted by offering a comparative analysis of the commitment to renewable energy by nineteen OECD governments from 1990-2000 using cross-sectional time series analysis. The main findings suggest that presidential democracies have higher levels of renewable energy R&D than parliamentary democracies and proportional legislative electoral systems have higher levels of renewable energy R&D than majoritarian electoral systems. However, these results should be interpreted cautiously as the impact of other political variables on renewable energy R&D, government composition and number of effective legislative parties, remains inconclusive.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCreighton Universityen_US
dc.rightsCopyright 2010 by Authoren_US
dc.titlePolitical Factors Predicting Renewable Energy Research and Development Levels: Mixed Results in Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development Countries from 1990-2000.en_US
dc.typeThesis
dc.rights.holderDrew D. Sendelbachen_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorSendelbach, Drew D.en_US
dc.embargo.terms2011-08-24
dc.degree.levelMA (Master of Arts)en_US
dc.degree.disciplineInternational Relations (graduate program)en_US
dc.degree.nameM.A. in International Relationsen_US
dc.degree.grantorGraduate Schoolen_US
dc.degree.committeeClark, Terry D.en_US
dc.degree.committeeBriggs, Kristie N.en_US


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