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dc.contributor.authorJacobs, Josephen_US
dc.contributor.illustratorBatten, John Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-25T16:15:31Z
dc.date.available2016-01-25T16:15:31Z
dc.date.issued1892en_US
dc.identifier.isbn0486218287en_US
dc.identifier.other2416 (Access ID)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/77972
dc.description.abstractThis book, apparently a facsimile of a David Nutt edition of 1892, reproduces, though with different pagination, my 1905? Putnam's edition. See my comments there. I can add to them that The Tiger, the Brahman, and the Jackal (66) gets the exasperated tiger to come upon the idea of showing the supposedly stupid jackal how it all started. The note (246) on The Gold-Giving Serpent presents Benfey's argument for the Indian origin of the versions of both Babrius and Phaedrus. This edition presents well The Farmer and the Moneylender (152) with its characteristic motif of Whatever you get, I get double. I had not remembered the good story How the Wicked Sons were Duped (221). The Pigeon and the Crow (223) reminds me of some story, but I cannot put a finger on it among Aesopic materials.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityJoseph Jacobsen_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherDover Publications Inc.,en_US
dc.subject.lccPZ8.J19 Ind 1969en_US
dc.titleIndian Fairy Talesen_US
dc.typeBook, Whole
dc.publisher.locationNYen_US
dc.url.link1http://creighton-primo.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/primo_library/libweb/action/search.do?fn=search&ct=search&initialSearch=true&mode=Basic&tab=default_tab&indx=1&dum=true&srt=rank&vid=01CRU&frbg=&tb=t&vl%28freeText0%29=991004718769702656&scp.scps=scope%3A%2801CRU%29%2Cscope%3A%2801CRU_ALMA
dc.acquired.locationBluestem, Lincolnen_US
dc.cost.usCost: $3.50en_US
dc.date.acquired1996-12en_US
dc.date.printed1969en_US
dc.subject.local1Jatakasen_US
dc.subject.local4Title Page Scanneden_US
dc.time.yr1892


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