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dc.contributor.authorAesopen_US
dc.contributor.authorKoram, Jamalen_US
dc.contributor.illustratorIllustrated by Thandiwe Muhammaden_US
dc.contributor.illustratorMbengue, Dembaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-25T16:50:08Z
dc.date.available2016-01-25T16:50:08Z
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.identifier.isbn1877610089 (v. 2)en_US
dc.identifier.other3665 (Access ID)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/79019
dc.description.abstractI got this signed copy of Volume II along with a signed copy of Volume I (1989) on Ebay. See my comments there and on the first printing of the first edition in the same year. Here are twenty-five fables with an introduction before and a glossary after the stories. There are ten black-and-white illustrations, ranging from over half-a-page to a full-page in size. Perhaps the best of them is a fine silhouette presentation of MSA (53). The introduction reproduces the introduction of the latest version of the first volume, but drops references to a once-planned third volume and to the illustrations of the text. It highlights the characters about to appear in this volume. The dialect makes for enjoyable reading, right down to the surprising copastetic (7). AL becomes Nehuti and the Bear (9), though it is still set in the time of the Greeks and Romans. The source of the voice telling the traveler to move his wagon himself is never identified (19). Instead of a dolphin, we get a camel carrying a monkey (25). Kolobahn is Dakar's market. Does the story work if the camel asks Have you seen Kolobahn there lately? Do you know him? The jump at Rhodes has become a slam-dunk in Kano (27)! The Lion in Love is transformed into Juma Loses His Locks (36), in which Juma gets new clothes, removes his beard and moustache, and gives up his dred locks for love, only to come up unsatisfactory in the eyes of his sweetheart's father because he is a storyteller. Br'er Wolf and His Cousin (42) combines DW and TMCM. The rooster who finds a diamond ring rejects it partly for a new reason: Every time I'd look at it, I'd be thinking about the pain and suffering African people are going through to pull precious baubles from deep within the earth (48). The glossary is on 56-70. We still get Jamal Koram's name after almost every individual fable.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityBy Jamal Koram the StoryManen_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSea Island Information Groupen_US
dc.subject.lccPZ8.2.K67 Ae 1989en_US
dc.titleAesop: Tales of Aethiop the African, Volume IIen_US
dc.typeBook, Whole
dc.publisher.locationBeltsville, MDen_US
dc.url.link1http://creighton-primo.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/primo_library/libweb/action/search.do?fn=search&ct=search&initialSearch=true&mode=Basic&tab=default_tab&indx=1&dum=true&srt=rank&vid=01CRU&frbg=&tb=t&vl%28freeText0%29=991004891959702656&scp.scps=scope%3A%2801CRU%29%2Cscope%3A%2801CRU_ALMA
dc.acquired.locationDonald Smith, Taylorsville, KY, through Ebayen_US
dc.cost.usCost: $2.50en_US
dc.date.acquired2001-02en_US
dc.date.printed1992en_US
dc.description.note3Signed, inscribed first edition, first printingen_US
dc.printer.locationUSAen_US
dc.subject.local1Aesopen_US
dc.subject.local4Title Page Scanneden_US
dc.time.yr1992


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