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dc.contributor.authorPienaar, Kathyen_US
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Dianneen_US
dc.contributor.illustratorIllustrated by Kathy Pienaaren_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-25T19:38:18Z
dc.date.available2016-01-25T19:38:18Z
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.isbn1868729516en_US
dc.identifier.other5434 (Access ID)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/80974
dc.description.abstractThere are perhaps thirty stories in this engaging book. The stories are grouped by animals; many are etiological. After an animal's stories, there is first a pair of full-page colored illustrations and then a section Interesting facts about the animal. Most of the verbs, prepositions, and possessives are not capitalized in the titles for the various chapters. Many of the stories are fables. Leopard Cub (22) shows how a wronged animal will get revenge, often on the wrong party. How Lion and Warthog became Enemies (25) is a story that combines two frequent fable motifs; first, the lion freed by the warthog wants to eat one of the warthog's young; second, the warthog asks the lion how he became trapped in the first place. Once he has him back in the trap, he lets it close on him and leaves as he came. Baboon's Revenge on Leopard (38) has baboon convincing leopard that he wants to groom him; as he does so, he and friends bury his tail in the ground and then beat him to death in revenge for leopard's killing of their young. Peace Among the Animals (47) is UP. Jackal the Trickster (50) combines two fables, one on directional footprints and another on using your enemy's heart as your cure. Hyena, Lion and Leopard Trick Donkey (59) is the familiar story about confessing sins to stop a drought. The first three confess crimes but mutually assure each other that they are not sins; the donkey confesses a peccadillo and is eaten for it. Hippopotamus and Elephant test their Strength (69) is the story of the tug of war arranged by Hare. Tortoise Deceives Elephant (86) involves the tortoise supposedly jumping over Elephant's head. This is the old substitution trick: the tortoise's wife is on the elephant's other side.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityRetold by Dianne Stewarten_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherStruik Publishersen_US
dc.subject.lccPZ10.3.S79 Ze 2004en_US
dc.titleThe Zebra's Stripes and other African Animal Talesen_US
dc.typeBook, Whole
dc.publisher.locationCape Town, South Africaen_US
dc.url.link1http://creighton-primo.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/primo_library/libweb/action/search.do?fn=search&ct=search&initialSearch=true&mode=Basic&tab=default_tab&indx=1&dum=true&srt=rank&vid=01CRU&frbg=&tb=t&vl%28freeText0%29=991004643849702656&scp.scps=scope%3A%2801CRU%29%2Cscope%3A%2801CRU_ALMA
dc.acquired.locationExclusive Books, Johannesburg Airporten_US
dc.cost.otherCost: 98 South African Randen_US
dc.cost.usCost: $16.30en_US
dc.date.acquired2005-01en_US
dc.date.printed2004en_US
dc.subject.local1Africanen_US
dc.time.yr2004


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