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dc.contributor.authorAntonucci, Emilen_US
dc.contributor.authorSavory, Teoen_US
dc.contributor.illustratorNine Drawings by Emil Antonuccien_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-25T19:38:25Z
dc.date.available2016-01-25T19:38:25Z
dc.date.issued1976en_US
dc.identifier.other5464 (Access ID)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/80999
dc.description.abstractHere is the hardbound version of a book I had found earlier only in a paperback version. There are several strange things about this book. This book seems to have none of the paperback's difficulties with either the placement of the Unicorn Press (it is in Greensboro) nor the date of publication (it is 1976). Let me take some of my comments from that 1977/79 listing. I expected that this would be yet another book using the concept fable very loosely, and I was wrong. This is a book of fables. They are like the works of Monterroso, but developed one stage further. So they are often four pages in length rather than two. They are certainly thought-provoking. Social satire is evident in The Alley Cat and the Laws of Status (13). One of the most trenchant is Little Brown Burros (25), and one of the most provocative is The Birds: A Fable With Alternative Endings (29). Maybe the saddest is A Dried Mermaid (33). Great for its category-jump at the end is The Purple Martin And His Cook (39). My final award, for most poignant, goes to The Silver Swan (73). Savory has fun throughout with the transformation of standard speech to fit the particular animal world of an individual fable. Thus in the battle between tyrannical mutant buffaloes and drab indigenous buffaloes, a white-harness (rather than white-collar) class of drabbians grows up serving the mutants (43). Further examples include humanpox (57) and local birds who belong to a Man-Watchers Club (65). The illustrations are reminiscent of Thurber, but Antonucci shows a less definite sense of line than Thurber does. The Ants and the Grasshopper (9) builds directly on the Aesopic fable. I like Savory's work here very much. This copy was withdrawn from the Cape May, NJ, library. Their loss is our gain!en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityTeo Savoryen_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherUnicorn Pressen_US
dc.subject.lccPZ4.S268 Clu 1976en_US
dc.titleA Clutch of Fablesen_US
dc.typeBook, Whole
dc.publisher.locationGreensboro [N.C.]en_US
dc.publisher.locationGreensboro, NCen_US
dc.url.link1http://creighton-primo.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/primo_library/libweb/action/search.do?fn=search&ct=search&initialSearch=true&mode=Basic&tab=default_tab&indx=1&dum=true&srt=rank&vid=01CRU&frbg=&tb=t&vl%28freeText0%29=991004610009702656&scp.scps=scope%3A%2801CRU%29%2Cscope%3A%2801CRU_ALMA
dc.acquired.locationDonna Donahue, Goshen, NJ, through eBayen_US
dc.cost.usCost: $1.84en_US
dc.date.acquired2002-08en_US
dc.date.printed1976en_US
dc.description.bindingThis is a hardbound book (hard cover)en_US
dc.description.coverThis book has a dust jacket (book cover)en_US
dc.subject.local1Teo Savoryen_US
dc.time.yr1976


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