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dc.contributor.authorColbert, Anthonyen_US
dc.contributor.authorRiordan, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.illustratorIllustrated by Anthony Colberten_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-25T20:00:28Z
dc.date.available2016-01-25T20:00:28Z
dc.date.issued1979en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9780670691562en_US
dc.identifier.other7071 (Access ID)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/82348
dc.description.abstractOriginally published in Great Britain by Kestrel Books: Penguin, Harmondsworth, Middlesex. The content of this book is Yerensay's Forty Fables, and I bought the book because they are labelled fables. At first glance, they seem more like the Tales of 1001 Nights, replete with jealous boots, demons, giants, genies, and winds that pick people up and deliver them long distances away. I was surprised, then, to find some of the stories that have none of these magical elements and more of a fable's tenor. Among them are The Nightingale's Song (33), about a nightingale who finds a clever way to escape from his cage; The Wolf and the Tailor (59), exactly in form like fables in which a ready destroyer is deceived by asking him to allow some action first; Two Lazy Brothers (94), who give up lying under an apple tree waiting for apples to fall because they realize that they would have to expend the effort of chewing them; Two Badgers (115), which warns that badgers should not dream of hunting camels; The Clever Brothers (116) about the perception-skills of the brothers; Who Is the Mightiest in the World? (122), which is the traditional story of marrying a daughter to the greatest, here beginning unusually with ice; The Poor Man and His Thousand Tanga (125) about a clever ruse to get a thief to repay a loan; The Leaning Silver Birch (129) about duping an arrogant rich man into playing the fool; and Upon Jewel Mountain (131) about outwitting an abusive master. A favorite word here is aul, a group of tents. There are lively cuts, about one to a story. A good example illustrates Upon Jewel Mountain (134). These cuts show up even better in color on the dust-jacket. There are a Tof C (7), maps (8-9), glossary (161-2), and commentary (163-171). This volume follows the first in the Russian Tales series, Riordan's Tales from Central Russia.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityRetold by James Riordanen_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe Viking Pressen_US
dc.subject.lccPZ64.1.R56 Ta 1979en_US
dc.titleTales from Tartaryen_US
dc.typeBook, Whole
dc.publisher.locationNYen_US
dc.publisher.locationNew Yorken_US
dc.url.link1http://creighton-primo.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/primo_library/libweb/action/search.do?fn=search&ct=search&initialSearch=true&mode=Basic&tab=default_tab&indx=1&dum=true&srt=rank&vid=01CRU&frbg=&tb=t&vl%28freeText0%29=991000479459702656&scp.scps=scope%3A%2801CRU%29%2Cscope%3A%2801CRU_ALMA
dc.acquired.locationSecond Story Books Warehouse,en_US
dc.cost.usCost: $9.60en_US
dc.date.acquired2010-12en_US
dc.date.printed1979en_US
dc.description.bindingThis is a hardbound book (hard cover)en_US
dc.description.coverThis book has a dust jacket (book cover)en_US
dc.printer.locationGreat Britainen_US
dc.subject.local1Collectionen_US
dc.title.seriesRussian Tales IIen_US
dc.time.yr1979


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