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dc.contributor.advisorNielson, P. Raymonden_US
dc.contributor.authorSteinbaugh, John Kelleyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-13T15:10:51Z
dc.date.available2016-09-13T15:10:51Z
dc.date.issued1934en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/91697
dc.description.abstractThe land problem lies deeply rooted in Mexico's past. Centuries before the Spanish Conquest, the nomads arriving from the North found the arable land already occupied. This led to open warfare for the possession of the land, which has carried on down, even to the present, through struggles between neighboring tribes and villages. |This demand for land was so keen that it resulted in the development of a fairly well organized system of land-tenure among the Aztecs long before the Spaniard arrived. Land was held in common, usually by the subdivision of the pueblo, the calpolli or kinship group. In addition lands were held hereditarily(sic) by the heads of families, and public plots were cultivated for the benefit of the tribe and the Aztec overlords.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCreighton Universityen_US
dc.rightsA non-exclusive distribution right is granted to Creighton University and to ProQuest following the publishing model selected above.en_US
dc.subjectUnited States--Historyen_US
dc.subjectMexico--Historyen_US
dc.titleThe Oil and Land Controversy Between the United States and Mexicoen_US
dc.typeThesis
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.description.noteProQuest Traditional Publishing Optionen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorSteinbaugh, John Kelleyen_US
dc.degree.levelMA (Master of Arts)en_US
dc.degree.disciplineHistory (graduate program)en_US
dc.degree.nameM.A. in Historyen_US
dc.degree.grantorGraduate Schoolen_US


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