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dc.contributor.advisorClark, Terry D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKreitlow, Brian C.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-09-01T00:42:38Z
dc.date.available2009-09-01T00:42:38Z
dc.date.issued2007-09en_US
dc.identifier.otherKreitlow_China-AfricaThesis.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/91
dc.description.abstractThe last decade has witnessed a marked increase in Chinese activity in Africa, characterized by an explosion in bilateral trade, investment, bilateral leadership visits and the commitment of Chinese peacekeeping troops to Africa. While China and Africa have had longstanding relations, the unprecedented expansion in China’s interest in Africa has generated much criticism and fear abroad. This paper examines the many explanations offered for this expanding relationship: the neo-mercantilist quest for energy and markets; the effort to undermine Taiwanese recognition; a realist grand strategy to challenge the United States; and an effort to extend its soft power and ensuring its peaceful rise. After a thorough review of these viewpoints, I contend that the sharp increase in Sino-African relations is the result of a new Chinese strategy to rise peacefully and gain support for its vision of a peaceful world order, one in which the predominant paradigm of international relations is idealism rather than realism. I explore neo-Gramscian theory to understand how the legitimation of a leading Chinese position in international affairs is vital to accomplishing these foreign policy goals. I then review the use of various foreign policy tools as part of China’s Africa policy to track the emergence and possible causes of China’s renewed relations with Africa. Finally, I examine China’s relations with Tanzania to see if these larger strategic goals are also evident at the level of bilateral relations. Coupled with China’s visible rise, a correct interpretation of China’s interest in Africa is vital to ensuring a consistent and appropriate foreign policy towards China.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCreighton Universityen_US
dc.subject.lcshHegemony--Chinaen_US
dc.subject.lcshInternational relationsen_US
dc.titleBusiness or Pleasure? Examining the Reasons Behind China's African Ventureen_US
dc.typeThesis
dc.rights.holderBrian C. Kreitlowen_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.description.pagesx, 120 leavesen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorKreitlow, Brian C.en_US
dc.degree.levelMA (Master of Arts)en_US
dc.degree.disciplineInternational Relations (graduate program)en_US
dc.degree.nameM.A. in International Relationsen_US
dc.degree.grantorGraduate Schoolen_US


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