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dc.contributor.advisorCharvat, Charles C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorVoth, M. Agnes O.S.B.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-20T18:30:00Z
dc.date.available2016-10-20T18:30:00Z
dc.date.issued1947en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/92265
dc.description.abstractDame Nature, the beneficent genie, has in all ages, in all climes, in all vicissitudes of man’s life, held a powerful sway over his thoughts, his feelings, and his moods. In vain has he tried to subdue her. She has permitted him to control her resources; and these work for him, slave for him, serve him from the cradle to the grave. But who can command the forces of Nature? Who can say to the thunder, "Roll on!" Or to the sea, "Be still'." God alone commands where human potency is inadequate. |The power of Nature over man has been acknowledged through the ages. The Greeks worshipped her as "Demeter"; the Romans named her "Ceres." We of the Christian era consider her and her gifts as a precious boon that God bestows upon man during his earthly sojourn.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCreighton Universityen_US
dc.rightsA non-exclusive distribution right is granted to Creighton University and to ProQuest following the publishing model selected above.en_US
dc.titleNature in Scott and Longfellowen_US
dc.typeThesis
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.description.noteProQuest Traditional Publishing Optionen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorVoth, M. Agnes O.S.B.en_US
dc.degree.levelMA (Master of Arts)en_US
dc.degree.disciplineEnglish (graduate program)en_US
dc.degree.nameM.A. in Englishen_US
dc.degree.grantorGraduate Schoolen_US


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