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dc.contributor.advisorNielson, P. Raymonden_US
dc.contributor.authorBrady, Mary Hugh C.H.M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-08T17:05:17Z
dc.date.available2016-11-08T17:05:17Z
dc.date.issued1949en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/92634
dc.description.abstractIf "environment wields the mightiest mallet that hammers out the status of our souls," there must be in the being of every man a tiny mallet which shapes his individuality. Andrew Johnson and Abraham Lincoln sprang from similar backgrounds which had exactly opposite effects. The life line of Lincoln and Johnson are strongly parallel. Lincoln's father was a failure as a farmer but a handy man at most any kind of manual labor, and with occasional jobs he eked out a miserable existence, Johnson's father never attempted to follow a steady career. He was porter at Old Casso's inn at Raleigh, North Carolina, Sexton for the church, and keeper in Colonel William Polk's bank. He was the handy man around the town. Both Mary McDonough and Nancy Hanks were women of sterling character and great good sense who took a strong stand against the vicissitudes of life which threatened to overpower them.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCreighton Universityen_US
dc.rightsA non-exclusive distribution right is granted to Creighton University and to ProQuest following the publishing model selected above.en_US
dc.titleAndrew Johnson: His Relationships with Abraham Lincolnen_US
dc.typeThesis
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.description.noteProQuest Traditional Publishing Optionen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorBrady, Mary Hugh C.H.M.en_US
dc.degree.levelMA (Master of Arts)en_US
dc.degree.disciplineHistory (graduate program)en_US
dc.degree.nameM.A. in Historyen_US
dc.degree.grantorGraduate Schoolen_US


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