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dc.contributor.advisorSmith, Paul F. S.J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDonahoe, Harry L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-18T17:21:21Z
dc.date.available2016-11-18T17:21:21Z
dc.date.issued1950en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/92705
dc.description.abstractOne of the most effective methods of studying any writer is to read his works in the order in which they were written. Custom in literary history sanctions the practice of studying an author period by period. When a literary artist has worked at his craft for a lifetime, scholars find it conventional to analyze the master’s work into convenient groups or units for detailed study. This process affords critics the opportunity of tracing more clearly the gradual growth of the poet’s mind from one production to another. In English letters this has been the accepted practice for Chaucer, with his French, Italian, and English periods, as well as for Spenser, for Milton, for Dryden, for Pope, for Wordsworth, for most Romantic poets, for Browning, and for Tennyson, to mention only the major poets. Also the academic practice of dividing Shakespeare’s dramatic works into several periods is a helpful device in the study of his development both as an artist and a dramatist.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCreighton Universityen_US
dc.rightsA non-exclusive distribution right is granted to Creighton University and to ProQuest following the publishing model selected above.en_US
dc.titleA Comparative Study of Shakespeare’s Periods of Divisionen_US
dc.typeThesis
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.description.noteProQuest Traditional Publishing Optionen_US
dc.contributor.cuauthorDonahoe, Harry L.en_US
dc.degree.levelMA (Master of Arts)en_US
dc.degree.disciplineEnglish (graduate program)en_US
dc.degree.nameM.A. in Englishen_US
dc.degree.grantorGraduate Schoolen_US


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