Now showing items 21-40 of 115

    • The Eclipses of 1908 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1908)
      First Paragraph: | During the year 1908 there will be three eclipses of the sun. The first of these will occur on January 3, and will be visible to a part of the United States near the time of sunset. The second will take ...
    • The Eclipses of 1909 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1909)
      First Paragraph: | During the year 1909 there will be four eclipses, two of the sun and two of the moon. All of these, except one solar eclipse, will be more or less visible in the United States.
    • The Eclipses of 1916 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1916)
      First Paragraph: | There will be five eclipses during the year 1916. The first three will be completely visible all over the United States, the fourth can be seen only in Australia and its adjacent waters, while the fifth, ...
    • Edward Heis 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1906)
      First Paragraph: | The centenary of the birth of a great astronomer naturally calls for some notice of the man and his work. | Edward Heis was born in Cologne, Germany, on February 18, 1806. He was the third son of George ...
    • Envelope Rosettes 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1920)
      First Paragraph: | One way of drawing a cardioid is to make a pen start in phase 90° from the center of a disk and move along a radius with simple harmonic motion, while the disk revolves with a uniform angular speed of ...
    • Experimental Proofs of the Earth’s Rotation 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1913)
      First Paragraph: | In establishing the truth of the Copernican system, professors of astronomy are apt to look upon Foucault’s pendulum as the one experimental proof of the earth’s diurnal rotation. They may also possibly ...
    • Father Angelo Secchi 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1918)
      First Paragraph: | A century ago, on June 29,1818, there was born at Reggio in AEmilia, Italy, a child that was destined to become one of the greatest astronomers of his age. He was to open up new avenues of research and ...
    • Father Hagens Astrophotographic Journey 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1907)
      First Paragraph: | It was in the early part of April, 1906, that Father Hagen took his departure from the Georgetown College Observatory in order to obey the summons of Pope Pius X and assume the directorship of the Vatican ...
    • A Fifty-Foot Mercury Telescope 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1922)
      First Paragraph: | Some months ago the press brought the great news that a monster telescope, 50 feet in diameter, was being projected on an entirely novel and reliable principle, such that its construction would not only ...
    • The Frequency of Total Eclipses of the Sun at a Given Place 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1924)
      First Paragraph: | We may put it down as a fact, that whenever an eclipse of the Sun occurs at any place, the astronomer there is sure to be asked, especially by the representatives of the press: “Does an eclipse of the ...
    • Gaging a Horizontal Cylinder 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1916)
      First Paragraph: | The actual amount of liquid present at any time in a horizontal cylindrical tank may be gaged very rapidly, if we make use of a graphic process such as is furnished by the diagram in this article. As the ...
    • Harmonic Curves 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (Creighton University. Omaha, Nebraska, 1926)
      Harmonic curves always captivate the eye by their wonderful beauty and their endless variety. They have that correct proportion in their parts which delights the artist, that simplicity of construction in their apparent ...
    • A Heliostat for the Lecture Room 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1913)
      First Paragraph: | A heliostat, that will hold a beam of sunlight as steady as if it came from a stereopticon fed by a self-focusing arc-lamp, is looked upon by the majority of professors of physics as ideal but quite ...
    • An Historical Examination of the Connection of Calixtus III With Halley’s Comet 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1910)
      First Paragraph: | There has just appeared from the Vatican Press a large-sized pamphlet of forty pages, which deserves to be regarded as the final word concerning the connection between Calixtus III and Halley’s comet. ...
    • Identification of Wires in a Cable 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1926)
      First Paragraph: | For telephone men and others who are accustomed to handle cables with hundreds of wires in them, their identification is mere child’s play, as it is done by the color or character of its insulation, its ...
    • Is Mars Inhabited? 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1909)
      First Paragraph: | The question as to whether the planet Mars is actually inhabited by a race of intelligent beings is frequently brought to our notice by the press. It is a most interesting question, not only in itself, ...
    • Is Newton’s Theory of Gravity All Wrong 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1919)
      First Paragraph: | In these days of unrest, when the alignment of nations, no less than their own internal machinery, is so seriously threatened with disarrangement that the established order of thousands of years runs ...
    • Is the Earth Falling into the Sun 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1911)
      First Paragraph: | It has often been said that no astronomer can be an atheist. The scale upon which the universe is built; the endless variety and the infinite number of the visible stars, all of which are self-luminous ...
    • Jesuit Astronomy 

      Rigge, William F., S.J.; Schreiber, John, S.J. (1904)
      First Paragraph: | Part I. The Old Society, 1540-1773 | In the following pages I have attempted to jot down a few notes concerning the Jesuits of the 17th and 18th centuries and their relation to astronomy: I say notes, ...
    • The Lunar Saros 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1918)
      First Paragraph: | In speaking of the Saros, that period of 18 years 10 or 11 days (according as 5 or 4 leap years intervene) 7 hours and 42 minutes, after which eclipses repeat themselves in the same order and with very ...