Now showing items 39-58 of 115

    • Jesuit Astronomy 

      Rigge, William F., S.J.; Schreiber, John, S.J. (1904)
      First Paragraph: | Part I. The Old Society, 1540-1773 | In the following pages I have attempted to jot down a few notes concerning the Jesuits of the 17th and 18th centuries and their relation to astronomy: I say notes, ...
    • The Lunar Saros 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1918)
      First Paragraph: | In speaking of the Saros, that period of 18 years 10 or 11 days (according as 5 or 4 leap years intervene) 7 hours and 42 minutes, after which eclipses repeat themselves in the same order and with very ...
    • Mathematics and Its Power to Train the Mind 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1910)
      First Paragraph: | The very important place that mathematics occupies in education is sufficiently evinced by the fact that it has always been judged to be an essential branch in the curriculum of every school of learning ...
    • The North Pole Part 1 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1913)
      First Paragraph | The poles of the earth are, in the mathematical as well as in the ordinary sense of the word, singular points; that is to say, they possess many essential features which do not apply in any way to other ...
    • The North Pole Part 2 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1914)
      First Paragraph | The axis of revolution about which the earth revolves is not fixed in the earth, as one would naturally suppose, and as even scientific men supposed until the contrary was proved. It moves about in a very ...
    • The Observatory 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1911)
      First Paragraph: | The many important improvements recently made in the Observatory are the cause of the present article. In mentioning these improvements, the opportunity is taken to speak of the nature of the Observatory, ...
    • The Omaha Tornado 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1913)
      First Paragraph: | The city papers have given so much information in words and in pictures concerning the destructive tornado that visited Omaha on Easter Sunday, March 23rd, that it would be needless even to recapitulate ...
    • The Opposition of Mars in 1909 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1909)
      First Paragraph: | Of all the heavenly bodies that adorn the starry sky there is none that a- rouses greater interest than the planet Mars. Mars is another earth, another abode, it is believed by many, of intelligent beings ...
    • Partial Eclipse of the Moon, January 29, 1907 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1907)
      First Paragraph: | There will be a partial eclipse of the moon on the morning of January 29, 1907. Less than three- fourths (71 per cent.) of the moon’s diameter will be obscured.
    • A Perpetual Calendar in a Nutshell 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1901)
      First Paragraph: | Those of our readers who are interested in calendars will find the annexed little table very serviceable. This table gives within a small space the Dominical letter for every day of the year. As these ...
    • The Polar Star 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1912)
      First Paragraph: | In the popular mind no star is more deserving of the appellation “fixed” than the polar star. We are told that the sailor steers his ship, and the explorer finds his way, by the aid of this celestial ...
    • Polar Triangles 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1906)
      First Paragraph: | Polar triangles are apt to prove most uninteresting to the student of spherical geometry. The cause of this apathy is to be found as well in the want of a globe upon which these triangles may be shown ...
    • Problems in Divided Circuits 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1926)
      First Paragraph: | Ten years ago the wire chief of the Western Union Telegraph Company in Omaha asked the writer to solve the following problem: | “A current of 44 milliamperes comes over a telegraph line and is connected ...
    • Realm of Science April 20th 1913 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1913)
      First Paragraph: | The Woolworth Building, now nearing completion in New York City, is the highest building ever erected on earth. Its top is 785 feet above the sidewalk, and its foundation is 120 feet below it, so that ...
    • Realm of Science April 20th 1914 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1914)
      First Paragraph: | What is the latest in astronomy? Have astronomers recently made any startling discoveries? Is the question that an astronomer is often called upon to answer. While its general tenor is very flattering, ...
    • Realm of Science April 20th 1915 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1915)
      First Paragraph: | That astronomy habitually deals with numbers, distances and quantities that stagger our ordinary imagination, is a fact now quite universally conceded by the general reader. While he is favorably disposed ...
    • Realm of Science April 20th 1916 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1916)
      First Paragraph: | The reform of our present calendar is a subject on which probably more printers’ ink has been wasted during recent years than on any other. Each scheme proposed—and there are at least seventy-two of them, ...
    • Realm of Science April 20th 1917 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1917)
      First Paragraph: | It has often been said that no astronomer can be an atheist. The scale upon which the universe is built; the endless variety and the infinite number of the visible stars, all of which are self-luminous ...
    • Realm of Science December 20th 1912 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1912)
      First Paragraph: | The National Geographic Magazine devoted nearly the whole of its October 1912 number to the canals and art treasures of China, illustrating them by eighty-five excellent photographs. The canal system is ...
    • Realm of Science December 20th 1913 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1913)
      First Paragraph: | While wireless telegraphy may justly be called one of the greatest inventions of our day, its use has spread so rapidly and its manipulation is mastered by so many youthful amateurs, that it behooves ...