Now showing items 96-115 of 115

    • Saved by a Shadow 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1913)
      First Paragraph: | In an Omaha criminal court a short time ago, the fate of an accused man hung upon a shadow, that is to say, it depended upon the accuracy with which the time of exposure of a certain photograph could be ...
    • Science in a Smokestack 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1903)
      First Paragraph: | Ever since the time when Foucault, fifty years ago, swung his memorable pendulum from the dome of the Pantheon in Paris and gave to the world the first experimental proof of the rotation of the earth, ...
    • The Solar Eclipse of 1916 December 24 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1915)
      First Paragraph | The magnitude of the solar eclipse of 1916 December 24 is about as small as any that can occur in practice, being only one and one-tenth per cent, of the sun’s diameter, according to the American Ephemeris. ...
    • The Solar Eclipse of June 28, 1908, as Visible in the United States 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1908)
      First Paragraph | The solar eclipse of June 28, 1908 will be well visible all over the United States. The Sun will everywhere be high in the sky, and the magnitude of the eclipse will vary from one-tenth in the state of ...
    • Some Problems on the Orthographic Projection of the Sphere 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1906)
      First Paragraph | When a sphere is orthographically projected upon a plane, the location of a point on its surface and of its projection upon the plane is determined by certain systems of coordinates, the interrelation of ...
    • The South Polar Eclipse of 1917 December 13 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1917)
      First Paragraph: | If there is anything in the whole realm of the wonderful science of astronomy that commands the admiration of the world, learned as well as unlearned, it is the accuracy with which eclipses are predicted, ...
    • Stereoscopic Harmonic Curves 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1924)
      First Paragraph | All professors of physics are fond of harmonic curves. Many even seem to consider it a duty, as far as their circumstances permit, at one time or another to construct a machine and draw some of these ...
    • A Strange Transit 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1911)
      First Paragraph: | On September 8 (this year) at 7:30 p.m. Father Hagen was standing on the wall of the Vatican Observatory and looking at the full moon as it attempted to transit the dome of St. Peter’s. When he first saw ...
    • The Tangent of 2X 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1922)
      First Paragraph | The object of this article is to show an interesting and practical application of one of the well-known formulas of trigonometry that appear to be so dry and valueless to the student who must memorize ...
    • That Dreadful Tail 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1910)
      First Paragraph | The predicted passage of the earth through the tail of Halley’s comet on the night of May 18 seems still to fill many anxious minds with dread. Its absolute harmlessness cannot, therefore, be emphasized ...
    • Time of Moonrise 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1905)
      First Paragraph | On account of the Moon’s rapid motion both in right ascension and in declination, the computation of the times of the Moon’s rising and setting is apt to prove very laborious, since it cannot be done ...
    • The Time of Sunrise and Sunset 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1903)
      First Paragraph: | If the reader is astronomically inclined, and has personally compared the calendar times of the rising and setting of the sun and the moon with those of his own observation, he must certainly have found ...
    • Total Eclipse of the Moon October 16 - 17 1902 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1902)
      First Paragraph: | An eclipse of the moon, especially a total one, is sufficiently rare to lose none of its interest at each recurrence. A clear sky and a seasonable hour add not a little to the enjoyment of the spectacle, ...
    • The Total Eclipse of the Moon of 1917 December 28 - The Total Eclipse of the Sun of 1918 June 8 as Visible in the United States 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1917)
      THE TOTAL ECLIPSE OF THE MOON | The eclipse of December 28 next is exceptional in that, (1) it is the seventh and last eclipse of this year,—seven being the greatest possible number that can occur in a year;—(2) it is the ...
    • The Transit of Mercury, November 14, 1907, as Visible in the United States 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1907)
      First Paragraph | The United States will be very unfavorably situated for viewing the coming transit of Mercury on November 14,1907. About one-third of the states will not see the planet at all upon the Sun’s face, and the ...
    • The Value of Cobweb 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1911)
      First Paragraph | We have often been told of the value of what are generally called trifles. We know that very great things often depend upon very small ones, that, for example, the lives of many people and the safety of ...
    • What Catholics Have Done For Astronomy 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1910)
      First Paragraph: | If love of one’s own is a virtue, if praise of our heroes is a noble passion, then we as Catholics have every reason to glory in the achievements of our co-religionists in all the sciences, and especially ...
    • When an Eclipse Prevented a War 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1920)
      First Paragraph: | It is an historical fact that once, at least, a total eclipse of the Sun really prevented a war. Of course, the threatened war was not of the magnitude that shocked the world a few years ago, nor would ...
    • Why is the Moon? 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1913)
      First Paragraph | Perhaps the title of this article sounds odd to the reader on account of its similarity to an old conundrum. No pleasantry of the sort is, however, intended, my object is simply to show to some extent why ...
    • Within Two Degrees of Absolute Zero 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1914)
      First Paragraph: | Amongst the many brilliant discoveries of the present 1 year, the approach within two degrees of the absolute zero of temperature will most likely be awarded the prize. Professor Kammerlingh Onnes of ...