Now showing items 1-20 of 115

    • Astronomy 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1900)
      First Paragraph: | Creighton University offers its students facilities in the study of practical Astronomy that are surpassed by few institutions in the country. The Observatory that it places at their command is of the ...
    • A Perpetual Calendar in a Nutshell 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1901)
      First Paragraph: | Those of our readers who are interested in calendars will find the annexed little table very serviceable. This table gives within a small space the Dominical letter for every day of the year. As these ...
    • The Eclipse Expedition of the Creighton University to Washington Georgia 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1901)
      First Paragraph: | Creighton University has contributed its share towards the scientific observation of the total solar, eclipse of May 28, 1900, so far as its means and circumstances permitted. As this great event occurred ...
    • Total Eclipse of the Moon October 16 - 17 1902 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1902)
      First Paragraph: | An eclipse of the moon, especially a total one, is sufficiently rare to lose none of its interest at each recurrence. A clear sky and a seasonable hour add not a little to the enjoyment of the spectacle, ...
    • Science in a Smokestack 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1903)
      First Paragraph: | Ever since the time when Foucault, fifty years ago, swung his memorable pendulum from the dome of the Pantheon in Paris and gave to the world the first experimental proof of the rotation of the earth, ...
    • The Time of Sunrise and Sunset 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1903)
      First Paragraph: | If the reader is astronomically inclined, and has personally compared the calendar times of the rising and setting of the sun and the moon with those of his own observation, he must certainly have found ...
    • Jesuit Astronomy 

      Rigge, William F., S.J.; Schreiber, John, S.J. (1904)
      First Paragraph: | Part I. The Old Society, 1540-1773 | In the following pages I have attempted to jot down a few notes concerning the Jesuits of the 17th and 18th centuries and their relation to astronomy: I say notes, ...
    • The Eclipses of 1905 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1905)
      First Paragraph: | Of the two solar and two lunar eclipses occur ring in the course of the year 1905, one of each class will be more or less visible in the United States.
    • Time of Moonrise 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1905)
      First Paragraph | On account of the Moon’s rapid motion both in right ascension and in declination, the computation of the times of the Moon’s rising and setting is apt to prove very laborious, since it cannot be done ...
    • Polar Triangles 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1906)
      First Paragraph: | Polar triangles are apt to prove most uninteresting to the student of spherical geometry. The cause of this apathy is to be found as well in the want of a globe upon which these triangles may be shown ...
    • The Eclipses of 1906 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1906)
      First Paragraph: | During the year 1906 there will be three partial eclipses of the sun and two total eclipses of the moon. One of each class will be visible in the United States.
    • Edward Heis 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1906)
      First Paragraph: | The centenary of the birth of a great astronomer naturally calls for some notice of the man and his work. | Edward Heis was born in Cologne, Germany, on February 18, 1806. He was the third son of George ...
    • Some Problems on the Orthographic Projection of the Sphere 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1906)
      First Paragraph | When a sphere is orthographically projected upon a plane, the location of a point on its surface and of its projection upon the plane is determined by certain systems of coordinates, the interrelation of ...
    • Dates of Easter for Two Thousand Years 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1907)
      First Paragraph: | Whenever we take up the calendar of a new year our first inquiry is concerning the date of Easter, since its position regulates the dates of all the movable feasts of the year. This is as it ought to be.
    • Partial Eclipse of the Moon, January 29, 1907 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1907)
      First Paragraph: | There will be a partial eclipse of the moon on the morning of January 29, 1907. Less than three- fourths (71 per cent.) of the moon’s diameter will be obscured.
    • Father Hagens Astrophotographic Journey 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1907)
      First Paragraph: | It was in the early part of April, 1906, that Father Hagen took his departure from the Georgetown College Observatory in order to obey the summons of Pope Pius X and assume the directorship of the Vatican ...
    • The Transit of Mercury, November 14, 1907, as Visible in the United States 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1907)
      First Paragraph | The United States will be very unfavorably situated for viewing the coming transit of Mercury on November 14,1907. About one-third of the states will not see the planet at all upon the Sun’s face, and the ...
    • The Eclipses of 1908 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1908)
      First Paragraph: | During the year 1908 there will be three eclipses of the sun. The first of these will occur on January 3, and will be visible to a part of the United States near the time of sunset. The second will take ...
    • The Solar Eclipse of June 28, 1908, as Visible in the United States 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1908)
      First Paragraph | The solar eclipse of June 28, 1908 will be well visible all over the United States. The Sun will everywhere be high in the sky, and the magnitude of the eclipse will vary from one-tenth in the state of ...
    • The Eclipses of 1909 

      Rigge, William F., S.J. (1909)
      First Paragraph: | During the year 1909 there will be four eclipses, two of the sun and two of the moon. All of these, except one solar eclipse, will be more or less visible in the United States.